NOAO < NOAO Home Page Image Archive

NOAO Home Page Image Archive

The last 5 images that have appeared on the NOAO Home Page.

September 03, 2014


Half of all Exoplanet Host Stars are Binaries

Imagine living on an exoplanet with two suns. One, you orbit and the other is a very bright, nearby neighbor looming large in your sky. With this “second sun” in the sky, nightfall might be a rare event, perhaps only coming seasonally to your planet. A new study suggests that this could be far more common than we realized. Read more in NOAO Press Release 14-06.


August 29, 2014


September 2014
NOAO Newsletter

The September 2014 NOAO Newsletter is online and ready to download. This issue includes information pertaining to the 2015A Call for Proposals, which are due September 25, 2014.

On the Cover
The cover shows an 8 × 9 arcminutes image of a portion of the Milky Way galactic bulge, obtained as part of the Blanco DECam Bulge Survey (BDBS) using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope. In this image, red, green, and blue (RGB) pixels correspond to DECam’s Y, z and i filters, respectively.

The inset image shows the 2 × 3 array of monitors at the “observer2” workstation in the Blanco control room. The six chips shown here represent only 10% of the camera’s field of view.


August 07, 2014

Dr. Arlo Landolt: 55 years of Observing at the National Observatories

Dr. Arlo Landolt, Ball Professor Emeritus of physics and astronomy at Louisiana State University, was recently celebrated for his 55 years of observing at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), almost all devoted to service to the astronomical community. In the summer of 1959, Dr. Landolt was the first guest observer at KPNO when the only telescope on the mountain was the 16-inch site survey telescope.

NOAO Press Release 14-05


June 23, 2014

SOAR Image Credit: M. Urzúa Zuñiga/Gemini Observatory

SOAR observations confirm a white dwarf so cool that its carbon has probably crystallized to a giant diamond

This image (left), taken in visible light at the SOAR telescope (right), shows the field of the pulsar/white dwarf pair. There is no evidence for the white dwarf at the position of the pulsar in this deep image, indicating that the white dwarf is much fainter, and therefore cooler, than any such known object. The two large white circles mask bright, overexposed stars. These results are presented in a recently published paper led by Dr. David Kaplan (UW-Milwaukee)

NOAO Press Release 14-04


May 06, 2014

T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage)

The Sky as Imaged by Travis Rector

This new image of NGC 896, a region of energetic star formation in a cloud of gas and dust, represents one of the many beautiful images that Dr. Travis Rector has produced using NOAO telescope data over the years. Rector has now released a total of 150 images; more than 100 of these can be found in the NOAO image gallery.

If all of Rector’s images were combined into a single image, it would contain more than five billion pixels – or 5 Gigapixels. Remarkably, this still covers only about 0.1% of the entire sky!


Link to all previous images [280].